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Our Top 5 Favourite Canadian Travel Blogs

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Our Top 5 Favourite Canadian Travel Blogs

Jade Calver

Bloggers Who Share Their Experience with Canadian Immigration Programs

Applying to work, visit, travel, or live in Canada can be a daunting process. Not only is the immigration process lengthy, there are so many different immigration programs you can choose from. Sometimes, it can helpful to read about someone else’s experience before you proceed with starting your own application. Today, we’ve compiled a list of bloggers who document their experience coming to Canada through a variety of different immigration programs, such as the Working Holiday Visa, Visitor Visa, Study Permit, and Work Permit. These bloggers journal about their experience applying to these programs and coming to Canada. They also write about their experience staying in Canada, offering tips for other foreign nationals who may visit a specific location. Scroll below to read about some of our favourite content creators and learn more about how they came to Canada.

Hayley: Working Holiday Visa

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Hayley is an Australian blogger who documented her experience coming to Canada on a Working Holiday Visa. The Working Holiday Visa allows youth with the opportunity to travel and work in Canada for up to 24 months. Canada currently has bilateral agreements for the International Experience Canada program with over 30 countries. Hayley came to Vancouver, British Columbia in 2014 to work full time and travel across Canada. Hayley claims that her Working Holiday in Canada was one of the most profound experiences in her life. She discusses her time in Canada on her blog, Hayleyonholiday.com.

Glaire: Study in Canada

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Glaire is an international student currently attending university in British Columbia. She came to Canada on a Study Permit, which she discusses in her video blogs on her YouTube channel. A Canadian Study Permit allows students to stay in Canada for the duration of their program, with an additional 90 days to prepare to leave or extend their stay. In her videos, Glaire talks about the process of applying for a study permit and coming to Canada without her family. She also answers Frequently Asked Questions about the experience of an international student in Canada.

Jaypee: Permanent Resident

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Jaypee came to Canada in 2016 from Singapore. He applied through the Express Entry System in the Provincial Nomination stream for Manitoba. Immigration Canada uses a federal system, referred to as Express Entry, to manage applications for permanent residency for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, Federal Skilled Trades Program, or the Canadian Experience Class. Since becoming a Permanent Resident of Canada, Jaypee continues to pursue his passion for travelling, which he documents on his blog, TheRusticNomad.com.

Gemma: Working Holiday Visa, Permanent Resident, and Citizenship

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Gemma was born in England and came to Canada in 2011 on a Working Holiday Visa through the International Experience Canada program. After spending a year in Canada, she applied for Permanent Residency through Common Law Sponsorship. Gemma has enjoyed her time in Canada so much that she applied for citizenship in October 2017. You can learn more about Gemma’s experience on her blog, Offtracktravel.ca.

Tracey: Work Permit

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Originally from Johannesburg, South Africa, Tracey came to Canada in 2015 on an open work permit. Tracey and her husband, Ryan currently reside in Toronto, Ontario. Since arriving here, she has spent most of her free time road tripping across Canada, exploring as many provinces as possible. Tracey is now in the process of applying for Permanent Residency. You can follow her journey to becoming a Permanent Resident of Canada on her blog, Journalofacitygirl.com


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